The Bhagavad Gita Video Series is Finished!

Hello Friend, I send you warm greetings and hope you are doing well. All is wonderful here in Bali. I do have a little news. Lama D is really cooking on his English. It is amazing. He watches movies and Ted talks daily, and asks me about certain words. This week he learned the words kleptomaniac, brutal, awesome, suspicious, alibi, gross, enthusiastic, circumstances, psychological, double-edged, deluded, and harassment. Whew! His grammar is almost flawless. WOW!

We are in the rainy season, and the rain is heavy for a while every day. This afternoon we took a rest after lunch, and it thundered louder than I have ever heard in my life. Then it rained hard and fast for about 2 hours. In Bali there are just two seasons here in Bali. Wet and dry. Most days are perfect for many hours. We love it so much here, we may never leave.

My daily healing is deep, as I follow the world mind and happenings in USA as best I can. I watch the matrix of delusion slowly unwind. Every day I feel old trauma being expelled from my body physically, mostly out of the bone marrow. This causes itchy spots on the skin, which are not painful, and eventually pass by the end of the day. Now that the Gita is finished I am inspired to do a research series about the Bible. I have a lot to learn here, since, I’ve mostly studied Eastern scriptures during my life. I’m especially passionate to learn about Adam and Eve, what really happened, what is the source, how the Bible stories were translated and interpreted by Islamic, Judaic, and Roman theologians.

The contrast between Eastern and Western traditions is shocking to me.  I’m interested to learn about the different “gods” or leaders that populated the Middle East during Biblical times, and what havoc they may have wreaked on humans. The Eastern “gods” of India, China, and Tibet were of a completely different ilk. Something happened there that isn’t in the history books. Just wondering – how has this affected the collective world consciousness that is quickly becoming more cohesive? My writings will connect everything to the current global awakening, and hopefully offend no one. It’s going to be fascinating.

This is my video set-up position for the Bhagavad Gita. I had so much fun recording this! Below you can find the complete Bhagavad Gita, all 20 chapters and videos. Yep! Enjoy!

We have a pet gecko! He lives between the bamboo ceiling and outer roof tile. He’s quite large and walks like a small Komodo dragon. We share the house and he talks to us at night. The owner’s workers tried to close his entry into the roof, but he comes back. He’s our baby! He’s about 18-inches long! Bali geckos range from 2 inches to 2 feet in size. They eat fish and insects, and seem harmless.

Bhagavad Gita Introduction

Welcome to Truth Amid Chaos, Video Introduction to the Bhagavad Gita in the light of current events. This is an epic battle about the 3D matrix and ascension to freedom. The Gita represents a foundation of Hindu philosophy because it reveals the path to spiritual liberation.

Once upon a time, in a far away land, Gods ruled the Earth. All learning took place in the form of stories and sacred texts, which people studied and memorized to pass down with each generation of mankind.

Bhagavad Gita means “God’s Song”, or “Gita” for short.
It is part of a larger epic story the Mahabharata, one of the great Hindu classics. We don’t know how old it is because it was not written. For thousands of years people memorized it and told the story in sacred chants. Finally it was written on palm leaves and assembled in string-bound books around the time of Christ. Reading the old Hindu texts is something like reading the Bible, centuries before it was codified in the Queen’s English. Except the Mahabharata is three times longer than the Bible. And the Gita is just a small part of it, about a battle between two royal lineages. The Gita is important because it brings up all the misunderstandings a human can possibly have, and explains them in the light of Supreme Truth. Are you ready?

Let’s start with our cast of characters in this story.

  1. Dhritarashtra, Blind King whose mind is clouded by desires and delusion. He is blindly partial to his sons, promoting their rulership, ignoring their evil atrocities.
  2. Sanjaya the wise, clairvoyant advisor to Blind King, who sees for him carries on a conversation with him throughout the battle.
  3. Duryodhana, “Dirty Fighter”, is son of the blind king Dhritarashtra. He is the cruel, young heir apparent to the kingdom, antagonist in the battle, and a chief enemy of Truth.
  4. Arjuna, the Hero and protagonist, is God’s dearest friend and devotee, He is one of the five virtuous Pandava brothers, and a great warrior.
  5. Krishna the Blue God, is a divine teacher who comes to Earth whenever wisdom is forgotten, as a distant cousin and chariot driver for Arjuna.
  6. Yudhishthira, Rightful Heir to the throne, is Arjuna’s older brother, son of King Pandu. In this story the Pandava brothers are the forces of Truth and good. The Kauravas, represent the lower forces of selfishness and evil.
  7. Ghandhari, is the wife of blind king Dhritarashtra, mother of wicked Duryodhana dirty fighter. Jealous at the birth of Yudhishthira, rightful heir, she birthed an army by dividing a chunk of flesh that came out from her body into 100 jars of ghee, to birth 100 heartless warriors to fight in the battle.
  8. Drona, Enemy General, gifted teacher of both sides of the family, He taught archery, and battle strategy, but now leads the Kuru army against Arjuna and Pandava brothers.

Mahabharata – The Great Hindu Classic
The Mahabharata is an epic story of struggle for the important kingdom of Hastinapura in NW India. We study it because its symbolism teaches about of life and overcoming death.

A brief background tells of a blind prince destined to hold the throne as king, but since he, Dhritarashtra was born blind his virtuous brother Pandu became king. And Pandu was a good king. He raised five virtuous sons, educated and trained in the ways of respect for the gods. The Pandavas and the Kauravas are actually cousins because all are descended from the same grandfather king of the Kuru clan. But sadly, King Pandu dies because of a cruel curse, and his blind brother assumes the throne. Pandu’s oldest son is Yudhistara, the rightful heir, soon to be king. But the blind king’s son Dirty Fighter and his cronies have other plans. They play terrible tricks of cruelty and treachery. Once they built a castle of ghee and inflammables designed to explode with the slightest spark. The Pandavas were warned by a wise uncle. When it was set fire and exploded to bits, they miraculously escaped through a tunnel, and went into hiding for many years, assumed to be dead. They return to everyone’s surprise, and the kingdom is finally parceled out, but they receive only a sliver of uninhabited jungle of dangerous snakes.

In spite of this, the Pandus build a glorious city, Arjuna falls in love with Krishna’s beautiful sister, they elope and then marry. His oldest brother Yudishtara is declared the rightful heir to the kingdom, and the Pandu royal family builds a beautiful palace on their land. They invite cousin Duryodhana Dirty fighter to visit, but he makes a terrible fool of himself by walking onto water thinking it is a hard floor. He falls into the water, everyone laughs at him, and he vows angry vengeance in a game of loaded dice, unbeknown to the virtuous brothers. In the famous dice game, Duryodhana Dirty Fighter cheats the Pandavas of their entire kingdom and are forced wander in exile and poverty for 13 years. During that time, the Pandava family prays to the Gods for a happy future for their line. They offer sacrifices to the gods for the safe ascension of their ancestors on the path to spiritual enlightenment in the etheric worlds. The Pandavas support old friendships and make many good friends. The live frugally and honestly in poverty for the 13 years of exile. Finally, when it is time for them to return to claim the kingdom, Dirty Fighter again refuses to share the land. Peace efforts fail. War is the only solution.

The struggle culminates in the great battle of Kurukshetra, in which thousands of warriors, loyal subjects, soldiers, armies, heavy weapons, neighboring kings with their armies, horses, elephants and heavy armor all prepare to fight to the death. Fortunately, the God Krishna comes as Arjuna’s best friend and chariot driver.

What Happens?
The battle begins. It explodes in terrible carnage with many dead. Complex conflicts of kinship, friendship, loyalty, betrayal and dirty tricks ensue. The Gita is the story of that bloody battle. The conversations between the God Krishna and Arjuna about Truth, life, death, and the purpose of physical existence form its lessons. At the end of the 18-day battle only the Pandava brothers, Krishna, and a handful of others survive. Yudhisthira the rightful heir becomes King, and the evil queen Gandhari curses Krishna with the imminent downfall of his clan. That’s the Bhagavad Gita. The larger story of the Mahabharata continues. Arjuna’s grandson later takes the throne. Eventually ALL the Pandavas ascend to the heavenly SVARGA LOKA the realm of the Gods on Mount Meru, united “serene and free from anger”. Svarga Loka is a paradise where the righteous live before their next incarnation. It could be seen as a state of consciousness in physical life.

The Gita is a tale of battle symbolizing the struggle of the mind. The is our internal battle a constant choice between Good and Evil, Duty and shame, Consciousness and Unconsciousness, Light and Dark. Desire vs. Wise action, Freedom vs. confusion. Krishna shows the path to higher states of consciousness. Sacrifice is higher than selfish action, ascension more important than material pursuits.

Cultural Backdrop of the Bhagavad Gita
The cultural backdrop of the Gita is important in order to appreciate its lessons. The Hindu social structure is built on certain beliefs and duty to one’s clan. This includes loyalty to one’s Caste system, called Varna. The caste system is said to have its ancient roots in the time of the gods, when astrological readings were made at birth in order to view a person’s highest blueprint and most direct path to freedom. The person’s life’s work be determined not by birth family or wealth, but on inclination and karma. There were four main paths, Brahman or intellectual, Leaders and warriors, business people, and workers.

One of the cultural backdrops of this story is human’s desire for happiness, higher states of joy, awareness, and freedom. This is sometimes seen as climbing a ladder, or a cosmic stairway to a pure state of being. Every world religion describes this in some way. Some traditions see realms of Heaven, Hell, Purgatory, and Limbo. Buddhism describes six unique worlds. Here in the Mahabharata we find 14 realms! Yes, Hindu Mythology has 7 Higher God realms, and 7 Hellish realms. Are they physical places? Other galaxies? Unseen spirit dimensions? Or states of consciousness? This depends on your interpretation.

THE ASCENSION PATH IN HINDU MYTHOLOGY 
The Gita holds that to increase the virtue of your life and your family, you do sacrifices and selfless deeds that benefit others, and this leads to a happier future, now or in your next life. So, an underlying assumption is to build integrity, you must purify your thoughts steadily in a chain of lives finally leading to freedom. Freedom is called Moksha, which means your earthly lessons are finished, and you finally merge in union with God, ending the cycle of death and rebirth. While on earth you must try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your physical duties in society and clan with your ultimate goal of Moksha or spiritual freedom. Sometimes the earthly duties and cosmic duties seem to be in stark opposition to each other. To find the highest path requires study and discernment.

THE SEVEN CONSCIOUS REALMS, or HEAVENLY REALMS (LOKAS)
There are 3 God realms, 2 Heavenly realms, and 2 mental realms. The universe is designed so that each experience can assist your ascension to know God. This is the Hindu belief framework and cuttural backdrop of the Gita.

  1. Divine Realm, Home of the Creator, Incomprehensible, Highest frequency vibration (Satya)
  2. Infinite Consciousness, Bridge to the creator (Tapa)
  3. Infinite Joy and Knowledge. Can encompass physical and non-physical beings. Can connect through thought (Jana)
  4. Finite Existence, Galactic Saints, instincts of the Heavens (Mahar)
  5. Heaven, Unified consciousness, Higher Beings, Where righteous souls live in paradise before their next incarnation. (Svar Loka)
  6. Spirit world, a world of thoughts and concepts, a realm of air connected to physical, Can observe but not act. (Bhuvar)
  7. Physical Life in 3D. Free will with a possibility of reset and ascension to higher levels. You live in a body, Learning to balance the senses in order to see clearly. Every experience is designed to help show you the way to Heaven. (Bhu)

Above these heavenly realms exist the very highest realms: Goloka, Mandiweepa, and Multiple Universes. Periodically, in Hindu Mythology, a great disaster or dissolution happens, called a PRALAYA. That’s when Heaven, Earth, and all the lower Hell realms collapse. Hindu astrology holds that even more rarely, the ENTIRE universe collapses even the highest realms of God consciousness.

The 7 LOWER HELL REALMS (LOKAS) are very interesting.

This is not just a devil heating you in a pot of oil, oh no, it’s much more hypnotic and illusory. After all, hell happens in the mind. Do you know anyone living in these worlds?

  1. Infinite Imagination, Emphasis on intense Sensory experiences, Passion, Physical Pleasure, Lust, Food, Intense music, Addiction, and Money (Atala)
  2. Privilege, Immense Wealth, Never Satisfied, Empty (Vitala)
  3. Evil used for material gain. Right turned to wrong, Rich is God, No Truth, No Spirit (Sutala)
  4. Trapped unaware in another’s hallucination, Asleep, May be controlled or insulated in this illusion by evil forces.  (Talatala)
  5. Outwardly peaceful but frightened world of hooded snakes who fear power. You can be abducted by monsters and taken from your home at any time. Many spies and imposters hence no trust. (Mahatala)
  6. True Hell, Home of devils, Constant war, Infinite rebirth into scarcity and fear, Hatred of everyone including God. God is the enemy here. (Rasatala)
  7. Darkest of worlds, Deadliest snakes, The very richest realm, Greatest Illusion, Money, Mystery. Reminds me a little of the movie industry. (Patala)

I am highlighting the 14 worlds, because it will soon become particularly relevant to our modern world as the story develops.

Chapter 1

Welcome to “Truth Amid Chaos” video series about the Bhagavad Gita. This is Part 2 in the series: “Arjuna’s Dilemma”. The Gita is an epic tale of challenge and ascension to freedom. The story is about a battle to the death between two related royal lineages in ancient times. This is highly relevant to our lives because it reveals ALL the misunderstandings a human can possibly have. God (Krishna) explains the Supreme Truth and outlines a clear path to ascension to spiritual freedom. The Gita is a sacred hymn and foundation of Hindu philosophy about events that took place roughly three thousand years ago. Today we present the Gita in the light of current events.

In Chapter 1 two great armies assemble for battle with thousands of men on each side. Arjuna is the greatest archer of the virtuous Pandava brothers, and Krishna, the blue god, will be his chariot driver. Arjuna surveys both sides of the battlefield, and sees only his beloved family. Dismayed, he refuses to fight. As the Gita unfolds in later chapters, God Krishna outlines the purpose of physical life, how to live in harmony in the 3D matrix, and how to achieve personal ascension.

Synopsis of the Gita is a war between the virtuous Pandavas and the evil Kauravas on the battlefield of Kurukshetra in NW India. After the failure of Lord Krishna’s peace mission, there was no other alternative for the Pandavas but to engage in war for their share of the kingdom.

All the warriors from both sides assembled on the battlefield. Armies, tents, wagons, weapons and machines of death, chariots, horses and elephants cover the vast plain. The enemy Kuru army is vast as the eye can see. The Pandava brothers’ army is small but skilled. Lord Krishna arrives in a magnificent chariot yoked by white horses to be driver for Arjuna, the great Pandava prince.

The deafening sound of a hundred Kaurava conches blares forth suddenly, signaling the battle. Arjuna and his brothers blow their sacred conches, and the air is filled with beauty and power. The Kuru army is petrified with fear.

As the two armies stand ready for battle, Arjuna asks Krishna to drive his chariot in between them so that he might survey the battlefield. He is horrified by the scene before him, his opponents are his beloved teacher, his grandfather, uncles, fathers-in-law, their grandsons, relatives and neighboring kings and childhood friends.

Confusion floods Arjuna’s mind. Should he participate in this terrible carnage? Is it right to destroy one’s relatives for the sake of a kingdom and ease? Would it be better for him to walk away from everything? Thoughts rush through his mind, and Arjuna feels a terrible foreboding. Killing his own clan would destroy the entire family structure. By refusing to act, perhaps he could avoid creating bad karma for himself. Yet he can’t tolerate perpetuation of evil in this life or in the next. Doing nothing would be irresponsible to his family, and his own destiny. He would rather die a wandering beggar. Letting his bow slip from his hands, Arjuna falls into despair and refuses to fight.

At every step in the Gita, we find symbolism and parallels to our lives.
The field of Kurukshetra represents the battlefield of the mind, a person seeking higher consciousness. We hold a pure wish to ascend, to finish the endless cycle of birth and death, but we find only paradox and confusion.

The evil Kuru warriors are itching a battle that is certain to annihilate one side, or the other, or both. This is the battlefield where Good and Evil meet. Truth vs. lies, wisdom vs. ignorance, We see many good people unwittingly line up to support the evil Kurus. Yet, to transmute evil and achieve a higher state of being, many of our good Pandava family may die. Even worse, endearing childhood friendships will be lost because of the requirements of adult duty.

Arjuna represents our lower, mortal self. Krishna represents our higher, immortal Self. Krishna and Arjuna thus represent both Man and God in dual nature. The dialogue of the Gita is God speaking to human beings. Krishna addresses our higher divine Self with the intention of lighting a spark of freedom of the spirit.

Chapter 2

Hello and welcome to Truth Amid Chaos, Chapter 2 of the Bhagavad Gita. I am honored to share this amazing epic with you. It’s a story of a battle in the 3D matrix of the mind, and ascension to freedom. The Gita is a beloved foundation of Hindu philosophy because it outlines a clear path to freedom.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people remembered and passed down with each generation.

Bhagavad Gita is “God’s Song”, or “Gita” for short.
One of the underlying roots of the story is our desire for happiness, higher states of awareness, ascension, and freedom. Hindu legends assume 14 levels of being.  7 Higher God realms, and 7 Hellish realms. While on earth you must try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your 3d duties with your ultimate goal of Moksha or spiritual freedom. This means your earthly lessons are finished, and you finally merge with God, ending the cycle of birth and death.

The Gita takes place as a huge battle is about to break between the virtuous Pandava brothers and their evil Kaurava cousins. The warriors from both sides are assembled on a huge battlefield. Armies, tents, spears, weapons, chariots, horses, and elephants cover the vast plain. Arjuna, the great Pandava warrior prince is joined by his charioteer, who just happens to be Lord Krishna, the blue God.

As the two armies stand poised for battle, Arjuna asks Krishna to drive his chariot in between them so that he might survey the enemy. He is horrified to see, his opponents are his beloved teacher, cousins, uncles, fathers-in-law, their grandsons, neighboring kings and childhood friends. Confusion floods Arjuna’s mind. Dropping his powerful bow, Arjuna falls into despair and refuses to fight.

The battle of the Gita symbolizes the internal struggle of the mind, constant choices between Good and Evil, Desire vs. Wise action. Krishna shows the path to ascended states. The entire story is a conversation between Arjuna’s uncle Dritarahtra, the blind king who sees what happens though his clairvoyant servant Sanjaya. And a conversation between Arjuna and Krishna standing between two armies poised for battle, in an infinite moment discussing Life and death.

Symbolism is Everywhere

  • God Krishna represents your higher Self that knows all.
  • Arjuna is your physical self as you face choices in real life.
  • Dritarashtra the blind king, Arjuna’s uncle, father of the evil Kauravas, is your blind ego full of desire.
  • Sanjaya is that clairvoyant part of you that can see everything without judging.

What happens in Chapter 2?
Krishna begins to reveal the Laws of Nature that apply to physical life. But how is this relevant to us now? Interestingly, ancient wisdom holds that the laws of Nature are the laws of God or relgion, which are also the Secrets of Science.  That’s it. There’s no separation between Truth, Laws of Nature, God, Religion, and Science. These are the law. So, it can never be a matter of opinion, or “faith” or what “spin” you put on it. These are the RULES of LIFE. Maybe in modern times we’ve gotten into thinking that we can actually work independently of Nature to make things happen. Krishna says that’s silly, there’s a lot more to the picture. If you learn the game and play by these rules, you’ll get ahead, find happiness, and you can advance to higher levels of existence. But if you get distracted by selfishness or believing everything you see or hear, you’ll be trapped in 3D, and just have to repeat the lessons over and over through living and dying many times into eternity until you learn.

The Bhagavad Gita is 18 chapters of verse in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods, in which Krishna explains how to live with integrity. He begins to tell Arjuna from many different perspectives why it is the best choice for him to stand up and fight. He introduces, the three basic paths of life. Each path is called a discipline, YOGA, meaning a training path that integrates your life. It is NOT a physical yogic movement. The first is the path of action, doing service in the world is called Karma Yoga, teaching you through your actions. The second is the path of knowledge, which works with the mind, called Jyana or Sankya yoga. The third is the path of devotion to God, or Bhakti Yoga that purifies the heart.

First Arjuna tells his despair, which Krishna sees as a lack of courage. In lines 11-30 Krishna says: “Relax! The soul lives forever. You and all these men are going to die sooner or later. Since you can’t kill anything, you may as well just do your duty. The physical senses show you moments of things you like and dislike, but the soul is eternal. The soul can never kill, and it cannot be killed. So why should we grieve for something that is going to die?

Then verses 31-38 reveal the path of action, chiding Arjuna to do his duty. As a trained warrior, he should welcome an opportunity to engage in righteous battle. If he does nothing he’ll be ridiculed as cowardly and weak. By fighting bravely, he will be respected by all.

In verses 39-53 Krishna further describes Karma Yoga, the path of action which means doing good works without fixating on the results or the fruits of action. He says cause and effect are a complex mystery of destiny. You can never know exactly what will happen, nor assume YOU were the sole cause of anything. Just offer your best work and let your highest destiny take care of the results.

In the final verses Krishna introduces the path of knowledge, showing how wise people transcend selfish desires to live with a stable mind in a high state of equanimity.

Krishna calls Arjuna many names, reminders of his past. He calls Arjuna Parth, devoted student, Son of Kunti, his queen mother. Or descendent of Bharat, his distant forefather king. Arjuna calls Krishna Keshav a God, or Madhusudan, killer of ancient demons, or by his historical name, Govind.

As you hear the verses I invite you to ponder these questions. See if you can integrate the ideas from Chapter 2.

  1. What are the three basic paths of life that train through actions, mind, or the heart?
  2. Which of these three paths most closely serves your unique character?
  3. What good works do you do? Do you do them without desire or attachment to the results?
  4. What are your favorite quotes from Chapter 2 to remember for life lessons?
  5. What situation in current world events illustrates these concepts?

Chapter 3

Hello and welcome to Truth Amid Chaos, Chapter 3 of the Bhagavad Gita. The Gita represents a foundation of Hindu philosophy.  Like the Bible and all the great books, the Gita is beloved by millions because it describes the Laws of Nature and shows a clear path to ascension.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people remembered and passed down with each generation.

Hindu legends assume 14 levels of being or awareness: 7 Higher God realms, and 7 Hellish realms. While on earth you must try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your 3d duties with your ultimate goal of Moksha or spiritual freedom, which means your earthly lessons are finished, and you finally merge with God, ending the cycle of death and rebirth.

The Gita takes place as a huge battle is about to break between the virtuous Pandava brothers and their evil Kaurava cousins. Thousands of warriors from both sides stand poised for battle. The hero Arjuna looks at both sides and sees his beloved relatives, cousins, uncle. It is his righteous duty to his brothers and his branch of the family to kill them all. But confusion floods Arjuna’s mind. He falls into despair and refuses to fight. His best friend and chariot driver just happens to be the God Krishna, who come to the rescue.

The battle of the Bhagavad Gita symbolizes the internal struggle of the mind, everyday choices between Good and Evil, Desire vs. Wise action. Krishna shows the path to ascended states of joy. The entire story is a conversation between Krishna and Arjuna about the secrets of Life and Death in 18 chapters in suspended time as the two armies stand poised for battle. Arjuna ultimately decides to fight, he and his brothers win, and they all achieve a virtuous ascension to the heavenly realms.

Every character and concept is symbolic.

  • Arjuna is your physical self as you face choices in 3d life.
  • God Krishna represents your higher Self that knows all.
  • Dritarashtra the blind king, Arjuna’s uncle, father of the evil Kauravas, represents your blind ego full of desire.
  • Sanjaya is his clairvoyant servant, who narrates what he sees for the blind king. He is that part of you sees and knows everything.

Arjuna is confused. He asks how a higher path of action requires any action at all. Krishna says life demands that you engage in action, you cannot do nothing. Right action is a form of honoring Truth, a pathway to Heaven. He reminds Arjuna to take the ego “I” out of his actions and avoid the trap being attached to the results or thinking “I made this happen”. If you do an action offering your best to God, you are free. But if you do any action out of anger, fear, or any other emotional state, then you are creating more Karma for yourself. He introduces an important concept, of the three modes of Nature, called gunas.

There are three levels of physical energy.

  1. Sattva is pure intelligence with no polarity, it is symbolized by the color white.
  2. Rajas is the law of motion, action, change, velocity, represented by the color red. Rajas exists opposite the quality Tamas.
  3. Tamas represents inertia, heaviness, ignorance, rest, and darkness, hence the color black.

One could also call these 3 levels, Sacred and Active vs. Passive.

The three Gunas are always in dynamic wave interaction with each other in the world around us, as well as inside each of us, one quality rising and then collapsing into each other, always maintaining an overall balance.

He said the 14 worlds function in a harmonious cycle of actions, sacrifices and offerings of gratitude by humans. Otherwise, the universe is lost. Krishna makes a famous penetrating statement that “It is better to do your own duty badly, than to do another’s duty perfectly.” It is the senses, experiencing preferences and aversions that create desire, twist our perceptions, and make people take wrong action. The solution is to practice positive actions with a selfless state of mind, so that over time you become established in a higher state of equanimity.

They discuss the question of Duty or Dharma, a cultural and individual expression of one’s highest path. Krishna says it is Arjuna’s duty to uphold his family both in this life and in the hereafter. That is why he should vanquish all desire and fight this virtuous battle.

They use several names for each other. Arjuna calls Krishna by Janardan, descendent of Vrishni (ancestral heroes). Krishna calls Arjuna scion of Bharat, meaning Shoot of India, and Best of the Bharatas or the best lineage of India.

As you hear the verses I invite you to ponder these questions. See if you can integrate the ideas from Chapter 3.

Questions

  1. What are the three physical levels of polarity? How does each quality express itself in your life?
  2. How does action with desire for a particular outcome create Karma?
  3. How does action without emotion or attachment to the results eliminate suffering in life?
  4. What are your favorite quotes from Chapter 3 to remember for life lessons?
  5. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 4

Hello I am Sri Jana and I am honored to share this amazing epic with you. The Bhagavad Gita is the story of a battle in the 3D matrix of the mind. It is an ancient foundation of Hindu philosophy that describes the laws of Nature and outlines a path to ascension for all humans.  This chapter is about transcendental knowledge.

In Chapter 4, the Gita begins to challenge our 21st Century thinking. Earlier chapters are straight forward and general . So you might think it’s good enough to get by. However, now from this point on through Chapter 18 the Gita lessons become more refined, in that they pinpoint every single one of our modern misconceptions about a true path to ascension. Just listen to it like it’s a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people memorized and passed down with each generation. As the Gita opens, the warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield as he prepares to wage war on his entire family. The virtuous Pandava brothers must vanquish their evil Kaurava cousins. Thousands of warriors from both sides stand poised to fight to the death. The hero Arjuna is torn between duty to fight a righteous battle, versus the horror of killing the people he loves. Arjuna refuses to fight. Krishna reveals the secrets of knowledge, how to carry out actions in a higher frame of mind in which he will not incur sin. Ultimately Arjuna accepts his destiny to fight the righteous war, he and his brothers win, and they all ascend to the heavenly realms.

The Gita reveals the Laws of Nature that have always been and always will be. They are none other than the Laws of Science, Religion, Life and death, Good vs. Evil. These Laws are One and can never be divided. We’re doing our best to translate from Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods, its sounds and utterances designed to uplift and teach into English, our favorite mongrel language of everyday life.

In Chapter 4, Krishna explains the sacred chain of essential teachings passes from one era to another directly from its original source, Almighty God. These teachings hold the Truths of Nature. But whenever the chain breaks, if the lineage of Truth is broken or the Laws of Nature are forgotten, and the people suffer, God personally comes to Earth. He comes with the purpose of upholding what is right, to deliver the devoted souls, to annihilate the criminals, and to re-establish the Scientific principles of Nature. It’s interesting that he comes whenever “righteousness falters / and chaos threatens to prevail”, like a crack in the foundation of reality, which pretty well describes our world situation to a “T”.

We all desire greater levels of happiness and satisfaction. Hindu mythology assumes 14 realms, levels of awareness. These views of Heaven and Hell are particularly relevant to me now because we see these qualities rise and fall in ourselves, and in people around us. The 7 Higher realms start with the earthly realm, moving up to lighter realms of air, thought, and spirit, and finally up to purest Godly realms of infinite Joy and Love. The 7 Hellish realms start descending with desire for pleasure and avoiding pain, emotions like anger, passion, and going down down down into much deeper levels of fear, vast wealth, the abode of evil, and total illusion, where you are trapped forever. It is important during your life on earth, to try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your worldly duties with your ultimate goal of Moksha or spiritual freedom. That means your lessons here are finished, and you finally merge in union with God, ending the cycle of death and rebirth.

The transcendental knowledge and the secret to freedom is to do actions without emotional attachment to the results, and to work as an offering in service to God. Then you are working not for your own gain, but selflessly for the benefit of all, thereby untying the knots of Karma. There are many appropriate forms of work, ritual, or offerings as sacrifice, they are all good. This transcendental knowledge is the most powerful tool.

God says: “Why would you want to die over and over again many times? Why do you want to suffer the same questions over and over again? Why focus on temporary happiness when you can have permanent happiness with me enjoying this loving exchange eternally forever?

God will never push it down your throat, he inspires you with love and devotion to soften your heart to help you to win in the battle of the skeptical, doubting mind. He says: “If you surrender to serve me, I will reciprocate with you to that degree. The greater your love and service, the more he is there for you. He says I live right there in your heart because without me you could never function. Your intelligence and senses would be blind without my super intelligence guiding your inner soul. He says, “those who fully understand my power are free from desire, fear, and anger. Being fully absorbed in me they do not have to take birth again, but join me in my eternal abode.”

However, these are not modern Western concepts. The idea of surrendering yourself to a God is uncomfortable to many. Let’s take a look at that. What would it feel like to surrender yourself to God? To offer all your actions as a sacrifice to a higher force of Good? Does it feel like melting? Like losing control? Is it frighting to lose the illusion of power over your own life? But of course, we never had that power anyway. What exactly are we giving up to dissolve into God?

Well, the idea of melting away is quite frightening. Is that like dying? However, in many ways we do that every day. What about my goals, my thoughts? What is the root of my existence? What pillars hold me? When all is in chaos around me, what can I rely on? In modern times, skepticism is considered a sign of intelligence, of discernment, independent thinking. Sometimes that is true. But the Gita says that skepticism and doubt are your worst enemy. Think of an Olympic athlete, the least bit of skepticism or doubt can mean the difference between success and failure. This is true in every endeavor. For some, it is their love for God, that sustains them, and that is all they need. When you are rooted in God, then God, not YOU, is the creator, the doer of the actions, God is the action itself, and the receiver all at the same time. Think about it. Think well, as the future of our world hangs on this question.

Chapter 4 outlines the principles of essential Action, Non-Action, and Wrong-Action. Essential or right actions are done to maintain the harmony and wellbeing of society and all creation. God says you should never be fixated on the results of your actions, or even think you are the doer. Any event has more to do with the laws of physics, destiny, velocity, intention, karma, momentum, critical mass,  power, and timing. These are the complex energetic factors that rule the cosmos far more than human action.

God says that one who lives by this Transcendental Knowledge,  can discriminate between proper actions and wrong actions. He acts from a serenity and not swayed by his emotions. This sets him free from the bonds Karma from his Actions. With this, you escape the trap of desiring fame or money, and your mind is stable in union with God. By doing your work as an offering, a sacrifice, you are freed from all karma that would otherwise be incurred if you act out of anger or desire for gain.

The Gita says you can look for a proper teacher to answer your questions rather than speculate or be confused. When you notice doubts arise in your mind out of ignorance, you should slash them with the powerful weapon of knowledge. Then Krishna tells Arjuna again to stand up and fight!

A few words to know: Yogamaya is the power of original creation, the power by which God says he exists.

Yoga means discipline. It’s not a New Age concept. It is a careful pursuit of an inner path of personal refinement and ascension. Not movement. Krishna calls Arjuna serval names, such as Parantapa, scorcher of foes, son of Pritha, his legendary queen mother, and Parth, meaning devoted student.

As you hear me read the verses I invite you to ponder these questions.

Questions:

  1. How can one discern the difference between appropriate actions and wrong actions?
  2. What does “God” mean for you?
  3. What does it mean, and how does it feel to surrender your life in service to God?
  4. What are the rewards of devoting your life in service to a higher force of Truth?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from Chapter 4 to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 5

Hello and welcome to Chapter 5 of the Bhagavad Gita. This is a story of a battle in the 3D matrix of the mind. It is an ancient foundation of Hindu philosophy, describing the Laws of Nature and a clear path to ascension. With each chapter the Gita lessons are becoming more and more refined, inviting us to reexamine our modern concepts to better understand the path to ascension. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story. Enjoy!

 

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people memorized and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield. Arjuna and his virtuous Pandava brothers are about to fight to vanquish their evil Kaurava cousins. Thousands of warriors from both sides are assembled, to fight to the death. Arjuna is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna encourages him to do his duty telling him the secrets of higher knowledge, how to carry out actions in a higher frame of mind in which he will not incur sin. Ultimately after 18 chapters, Arjuna accepts his destiny to fight. He and his brothers win, and they ascend to the heavenly realms.

The Laws of Nature described in the Gita have always been and always will be. They are none other than the unified Laws of Life and Death, Good vs. Evil, Science, and Religion. These Laws are One and can never be divided. The original is in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods. We adapt it into English as best we can.

All humans desire greater levels of happiness and satisfaction. Hindu mythology assumes 14 realms or levels of being. I find these detailed definitions of Heaven and Hell especially relevant as we see positive and negative qualities rise and fall in ourselves, and in people around us. The 7 Heavenly realms start with the earthly realm, moving up to lighter realms of air, thought, and spirit, and finally up to purest Godly realms of infinite Joy, Love, and Wonder. The 7 Hellish realms descend starting with desire for sensory pleasure and avoiding pain, emotions like anger. They continue down into much deeper levels of fear, vast wealth, evil, domination, utter illusion like a fictitious nightmare in which you are trapped forever. That’s why it is important to find the higher path. During your life on earth, you must try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your worldly duties with your ultimate goal of Moksha or ascension to spiritual freedom. Moksha means your lessons here are finished, and you finally merge in union with God, ending the cycle of death and rebirth.

Each chapter of the Gita examines a skill needed on the path to enlightenment. We see a clear progression to more refined concepts. Many of these are refreshing, some are challenging, and some we will need to hear many times. Yoga, meaning a discipline of study, comes from a sophisticated system passed down for thousands of years in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods. Now as we see our world cracking apart rather chaotically, it’s a perfect time to examine the ancient Hindu concept of Selfless action. Fasten your seat belts. It turns out ascension to higher wisdom requires greater and greater mental clarity.

Chapter 5 starts by comparing two paths to freedom that are outwardly different. The path of Renunciation of Action sometimes called Sanyas, which is like renouncing the world. And the path of Action with Devotion called Karma Yoga, or offering all actions to God. While the mental focus is different, Krishna says both these paths lead you to the same goal.

Both disciplines cultivate ascension while living in a body, using self-control and emotional detachment. To do Action with Devotion called Karma Yoga, we carry out actions without considering ourselves the doers. Instead, we offer our actions to the higher creator. Yes, a neat trick that disconnects the ego. Krishna says we should not think toward a reward or goal for our actions. And the reality of cause and effect is a more complex expression of energy in time-space. These events are flows, in ever changing wavesrather than fixed things.

This idea is challenging for some of us used to thinking of linear tasks and goals. How can I act utterly selflessly? What about “looking out for “Number 1?” What about achievement? What about the rewards I expect to enjoy? The recognition, the money. What about getting ahead, enjoying the comforts, nice clothes? If I don’t work for these things as goals, what will I look forward to? If I do everything as an offering to God, trust my life to that? Live in love? My world would probably collapse. Be realistic. You want me to surrender my life to the will of god? That’s like dissolving into nothing? Almost as scary as dying. Yet it is exactly why this story of a terrible war is designed to wake us up. We can put ourselves in Arjuna’s shoes just for a moment. He is terrified, standing at the brink, as destiny asks him to kill his teacher, his cousins and utterly destroy his family. Yet, since we now see our world completely falling apart under the most bizarre affronts to life and goodness I am willing to examine all other approaches with an open mind.

Krishna says relax. Everything is in God’s hand anyway. Quantum physics comes from the interaction of the three modes of physical nature: Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas. When we live and do actions with the intellect immersed in God, we are wholly absorbed in God, as the supreme goal of our offering, we quickly reach the state of permanent happiness from which there is no going backwards. Our sins and Karma are dissolved, and we live in peace. This is called living in God awareness. We are not pulled down by confusion. We are less fixated on physical sensations, so we have more equanimity, not easily excited, not easily upset. We see all beings with equal eyes as  creatures of God. We experience better health not conditioned by emotional reactions. We live harmoniously in our body, which is called the “City of Nine Gates” representing the human body with nine openings.

We can hold in check the forces of desire and anger, and therefore be happy. We learn to quiet the mind, concentrate better, focus on the third eye and cultivate the breath. By practicing over time, this expanded way of being takes over.  We get rid of negativity and doubts.

We find freedom – but freedom is NOT doing whatever we want for our own selfish ends. Freedom is doing actions according to the Laws of Nature. Freedom is when we work for the benefit of everyone without selfishness, and offer our actions to God. Well, THAT’s is a new concept of freedom.

As you hear the verses I invite you to ponder these questions.

Questions:

  1. What are the seven Heavenly realms and 7 Hellish realms described in Hindu mythology?
  2. How do you see the Heavenly realms infuse your reality?
  3. How are the 7 Hellish realms reflected in anyone you know?
  4. What is the practice of Action with Devotion (Karma Yoga)? How does one carry it out?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from Chapter 3 to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world  illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 6

The Bhagavad Gita is the story of an ancient battle in the 3D matrix of the mind, and foundation of Hindu philosophy. It reconfirms the laws of Nature and timeless techniques for personal empowerment and ascension. With each chapter the Gita lessons are getting more refined and specific. This chapter is about the benefits of meditation. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you’re hearing a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people memorized and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield. Arjuna and his virtuous Pandava brothers are standing at the brink of a huge battle against their evil Kaurava cousins. Thousands of warriors are assembled there on both sides to fight to the death. Arjuna is horrified and refuses to fight. The Supreme God Krishna shows up as his chariot driver and divine guide explaining the secrets of life, death, and why he should fight. Krishna explains the soul never dies, and shows him how to focus the mind to carry out this righteous war without incurring sin or Karma. Ultimately Arjuna accepts his destiny. He fights the war. He and his brothers decimate the enemy, and finally ascend to the heavenly realms.

Krishna has explained the path of pure action as service without fixating on the results or rewards. He introduces the next technique to ascension through training the mind in meditation. He says the mind can be your best friend, or it can become your enemy. If your mind is untrained you can never experience happiness, peace, or ascension, because the mind is restless and tends to create trouble. We can learn to calm the mind in meditation to attune ourselves to higher virtues. He explains where to sit, how to discipline the mind, how to balance the body, to eat and sleep regularly. In meditation, he says you must withdraw the mind away from selfish desires and focus it on the greatest good. When the mind is restrained from material activities, likes, and dislikes, you become strong stable, and balanced in all circumstances. This allows you to live a happy life of divine bliss and leave behind all stress and pain, even while you live in a body.

He describes meditation as contemplation, a path to achieve inner quiet. It’s not a meditation of thoughts, nor a devotional mantra, not a prayer or a chant. Not a visualization. It is not what we sometimes call mindfulness, which is more a practice of being present in the moment. He explains a meditation that is purely quieting the body and mind, observing your  thoughts and restraining them to discipline and calm the intellect to focus it on God. Without this training, he says happiness is impossible. He says over time this meditation makes a person strong, resilient, and impervious to stress. The training is difficult to master, but it is never lost, even in death, and you can pick it right up again to bring it to the next level in a subsequent life. It protects you from evil and becomes a continuous path of purification, until you attain Moksha, meaning union with God and freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth. So, in short this chapter is about training and quieting the mind through meditation, rooting the mind in God, and offering all actions to God without fixating on money or rewards. That’s it. Krishna uses the word Yoga, as a discipline or path, not a movement. He calls a practitioner of the path a Yogi, which he considers the highest and best kind of human that exists. As you listen to the verses, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What are the primary benefits of meditation?
  2. How does meditation train the mind to be impervious to stress?
  3. What is the specific practice of meditation that Krishna describes? How does one do it?
  4. Do you have a meditation practice? How would you describe it, and how does its benefit you?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

 Chapter 7

The Bhagavad Gita is the story of an ancient battle in the 3D matrix of the mind, a foundation of Hindu philosophy. It describes the laws of Nature, techniques to achieve ascension and outlines all the tools you’ll need to attain your highest destiny in life. With each chapter, the Gita lessons are becoming more refined, inviting us to re-assess our modern concepts to find a true path to ascension. This chapter is an explanation of reality and a metaphysical empowerment. Just enjoy with an open mind, as if you would absorb a transmission of a sacred story that you already know.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people remembered and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield. Arjuna and his virtuous Pandava brothers are now assembled, along with thousands of warriors to fight his evil Kaurava cousins to the death. Arjuna is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna enlightens him as to the secrets of higher knowledge, how to carry out actions in a higher frame of mind in which he serves God without incurring sin or Karma. Ultimately Arjuna accepts his destiny to fight. He and his brothers win, and they ascend to the heavenly realms.

The word Yoga means a “Path” or discipline. It is a means to achieving harmony between action and knowledge. When action is done as an offering infused with knowledge it leads to divine love and power in this life. This creates a harmonic relationship between the individual soul and the supreme soul. In Chapter 7 Arjuna asks about the nature of reality. What is the nature of being? What is the difference between the individual soul and Supreme soul? What is the nature of time and space? How does the physical world unfold from spiritual nature?

I confess, one of the reasons I’m interested in the Gita, is to reaffirm  Truth seeded into the hearts and DNA of ancient humans of every culture. And to discover how has shared Truth and goodness can become so utterly warped beyond recognition in modern times? How did this happen?

Was it the introduction of money giving way to selfish motives as a basis for collective awareness? Did we make money our God?

Now, as in Chapter 7, we have arrived at a critical meeting point between  quantum physics, biological science,   philosophy, Truth, and the power of the collective mind.

Pause. The words of the Gita are in Sanskrit, sacred root language of the Gods. We’re doing our best to understand in everyday English.

Arjuna is curious about the Supreme Almighty God called Brahman. So, Krishna defines the supreme God, the Self, the material world, the importance of religion, and the various other gods who rule the planets, the weather, and the elements. Many people devote their lives in devotion to lesser gods, but those who understand the nature of ultimate reality come directly to the highest Supreme God.

Krishna gives the Vedic  version of the creation of the world. He basically says “I did it”.

The Vedic Creation story is called the Nasadiya Sukta.

This verse is said to be over 5,000 years old even older than the Gita. It does not mention a supreme God, no mention of male or female. It only says “in the beginning there was neither existence nor non-existence. Out of that came desire, the primal seed of mind. Powers rose, and Gods came later. But from whence the universe came, whether it was made or not, only that one knows. Or maybe doesn’t know at all.

pause

Krishna doesn’t mention the big bang, or the 7 days of creation. He just says most people don’t have the perceptual powers to know God. And those that could know are deluded by desires, sensory inputs and stresses of life. He describes four different types of truth seekers. Some look for personal gain, but have no interest in the larger picture beyond selfishness – so they never touch the power of God.

Everything in the space-time continuum arises from the three modes of physics, the three gunas, of which he alone is the source. While he contains and comprehends the gunas and all things, they do not contain or comprehend them. That is the big difference between God and his creations. They are all informed by the divine, but they cannot touch the wholeness of the divine. God is not subject to anything in creation, yet all things are subject to God.

He says that divine power is not visible to all. It is veiled by the power of illusion. This divine Yogmaya veil hides His imperishable nature and eternal divine form. From this illusion comes a world of selfish desire and exploitation, bewildered by the illusory power of Maya, people cannot see the highest unchanging omnipotent nature of Truth, God. Krishna is none other than the Supreme God shape-shifted into the blue charioteer. Those devoted ones who surrender to Him receive divine knowledge of the Supreme God, of the Self, and master the laws of karma. Their conscious soul at the time of death goes directly to him.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 7, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What is the source of material existence?
  2. What are the four types of people who study the metaphysical, and which group is Krishna’s favorite?
  3. How does devotion to a Supreme God purify the mind and protect a person in this life and beyond?
  4. What is the greatest illusion that causes confusion and blocks people from happiness?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 8

When a deadly enemy is at your doorstep, destiny requires that you make a choice. How can lessons from the Bhagavad Gita offer us a new perspective and guidance today?  The Bhagavad Gita is a part of a huge epic the Mahabharata, about life, death, and ascension, that is over 5,000 years old.  A classic root of Hindu philosophy, everything is symbolic. So, if we open our eyes and ears, we just might discover that it’s directly relevant to our lives today.

 

The Gita outlines how to live in balance with the eternal laws of Nature and how to attain higher levels of being.With each chapter, the Gita lessons are more refined and specific. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people remembered and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield, where Arjuna and his brothers must kill half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna explains the secrets of higher knowledge, and tells him how to fight a righteous battle from a higher awareness in which he is assured to win, he’ll bring benefit to his family, and incur no sin or Karma for himself. Ultimately Arjuna accepts his destiny to fight this war. He and his brothers win, and finally ascend to the heavenly realms.

Arjuna is asking God Krishna some very tough questions. He asks what is the highest reality? What is the Soul? What is Karma? What is God? Who rules physical realm? Who rules the celestial realm? And most importantly he asks, how can one be assured to go to the Supreme God at the time of death? Krishna answers all these questions, revealing the secrets to the most direct path to freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth.

He says “The Supreme Indestructible God” just is. And that Supreme God has an ever-changing form that can seen in physical manifestation. One’s own Self is the individual Soul. Karma is the actions we do in the physical world and their effects.

Hinduism has lots of Gods, and they have a hierarchy. Krishna says don’t worry too much about the celestial gods, because they are not the Supreme god. They are subject to life and death. He says just go to the top God. If you are thinking about the Supreme God at the moment of death you’ll go right to THAT. Therefore during your life, and every day, it’s a very good idea to develop a habit of thinking about God all the time. Because God is the omniscient controller, more subtle than the smallest atom, who supports all, yet is inconceivable to the mind. God shines brighter than the sun and dissolves all ignorance.

Krishna repeats the meditation lesson from the past chapter, saying you should practice Yoga, learn to control all the body functions, draw the life breath into the center of your head and remember the divine. So when you die you’re ready. You think about God and chant the syllable OM to merge with God. Once you attain this goal you’ll never again be born into the physical world of impermanence and pain.

Krishna describes universal time, measured in Yugas in what NASA calls the precession cycle of 25,000 years. Even beyond that in Vedic astrology the universe has larger days and nights in an eternal cycle of billions of years. During the day of Brahma, living beings exist. Then they dissolve at the night of equal length. And when the next day comes, they all miraculously reappear in physical form. That’s why he encourages you to focus on loving God, because then you can be free of all this physical suffering and Karmic complexity.

The God Krishna also describes how to die. He say if you live in the light, you’ll die in the light and you’ll be free. If you live in darkness, ignorance, or attachment to the world that you see and hear, then you’ll live and die in the dark, which means you’ll be reborn again and again. These two paths of light and dark always exist. But the Yogis who know the secret are lucky in life and lucky in death. They don’t worry about rituals, elaborate mantras, books, austerities, or expensive offerings. They just go straight to the top and send love to the Supreme God all the time. This is the direct path. So, for Arjuna who is now pondering whether or not he should kill his family in a terrible war, Krishna says, do your duty as a warrior, fight the righteous battle with your mind surrendered to me. Then you will win a glorious victory with no bad Karma.

As you listen to the verses in Chapter 8, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What does Krishna say is the secret path to freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth?
  2. What is the Yogic meditation practice that leads to freedom?
  3. What do you do at the moment of death to merge directly into God?
  4. How can you practice this during your life so you remember at the moment of death?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 9

What is the single most powerful choice you have in life? The Bhagavad Gita says it is a choice to be free of the cycle of death and rebirth, or to come back again and again. This is the story of a legendary battle in the 3D matrix of the mind. It outlines the foundations of Hindu philosophy thousands of years before Christ. It integrates all world religions describing the laws of Nature and a clear path to ascension.

With each chapter we see the Gita lessons becoming more specific, inviting us to question our modern concepts, and to refine our understanding of ascension. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people learned by heart and passed down with each generation. As the song opens, the warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield. Arjuna and his brothers are required now to fight their evil Kaurava cousins. Thousands of warriors are assembled on both sides, to fight to the death. Arjuna is horrified and refuses to fight. His charioteer Krishna reveals to him the secrets of higher knowledge distilling in 18 chapters how to carry on a war between Good and Evil in a higher frame of mind in which he will not incur sin or Karma, and thereby attain union with God. Arjuna listens and finally accepts his destiny to fight. He and his brothers engage in battle. They completely vanquish the evil enemies of justice, and ultimately ascend to the heavenly realms.

The Laws of Nature have always been and always will be. These are none other than the unified Laws of Science, Religion. Good vs. Evil, Life and Death. These Laws are One and can never be divided. The Gita verses are in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods, which we adapt into English as best we can.

In chapter 9, Krishna gives Arjuna a choice. Do you want to be free? Or do you want to come back and repeat physical life again and again? He reveals to Arjuna the truths that will free him from the cycle of death and rebirth. He says I am the topmost Supreme, almighty God. Stick with me. Even though I stand in front of you in My personal form, do not be deluded that I have  a human personality. He says I’ve just shown up temporarily here 3D in to teach you the lost wisdom. I am the one and only creator and controller of the universe. I am the invisible seed, the Father, the Mother, the Sustainer. I am the purifier, the goal, I am your prayers. I am the doer of all actions. I am all your actions and the results of those actions. I am the medicinal plants. I am the Sun, the Moon, the rain and weather. I am eternal life. I am death. I am forever spirit and physical matter. I am the very one who enjoys your life, and the receiver of all your offerings.

Krishna says he created the universe in divine sexual intercourse with himself and his Female physical energy (Prakriti), This brings forth uncountable life forms again and again. In the beginning of the billion-years cycle of time, He creates the myriad physical life-forms. And at the end of the grand cosmic cycle, He absorbs them back into Himself, only to re-manifest them again. His Female Prakriti energy gives birth to all forms. Thus, his power eternally creates, sustains, and dissolves, to turn the wheel of the universe.

But ignorant people with distracted minds, adopt empty hopes, useless actions and futile knowledge. Deluded, they take on a false, demonic, or delusory personality. Those who fail to see the highest God must come back to be reborn. Worshippers of the mid-celestial gods go to those celestial realms. Worshippers of ancestors go there. Worshippers of ghosts go to ghosts. My devotees come up to Me alone, he says. Whatever you do, do it as an offering to Me.

Even though there are many things we love to worship, Krishna explains that there is only one Supreme God. Those people who are exclusively devoted to him as the Almighty God go to His abode and remain there forever. He supports those who wish to follow other Gods or life goals, as they can achieve positive results in other realms, however, they must return to a physical life. So,  whatever lesser God or goal you are filled with in this life, He will help you achieve it, but you’ll have to come back. So, you can follow the God of Money, Kubera, or the Goddess of Beauty, Lakshmi, or the Goddess of higher learning, Saraswati, and you WILL ascend to the realm of that god. So, whatever you live by, that’s what you become in your life and also after you die. If you live in anger, you’ll be angry after death. Just choose your world. If you live to be cute, you will go to a heaven for cute people. He says please, just go to the Supreme God, and direct all your devotion and actions solely toward the highest force. Be someone who lives in union doing everything for Him and offering everything to Him. ++++ With pure devotion his devotees attain mystic union with God and this releases them from the bondage of Karma, death, and rebirth. He uses use the word “Him”, although the Vedic scriptures hold that God is neither male nor female, The highest power encompasses all dualities at the same time.

God says he loves all creatures. Even the worst souls He accepts willingly and quickly helps them become virtuous. He protects all his devotees and provides them whatever they need. Therefore, we should dedicate our mind and body and lives to Him, always think of Him, and offer all our actions to him. That’s the secret teaching.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 9, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What is the important choice that Krishna offers to Arjuna in this Chapter ?
  2. How does the Supreme God create the world? What creation power does he use?
  3. What happens to those who follow lesser gods like money, beauty, ghosts, or learning?
  4. How does focusing on the Supreme God lead to freedom from death and rebirth?
  5. What is your topmost focused goal in this life? i.e. what God do you follow?
  6. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?

Chapter 10

What’s your vision of Universal Power? Is it like a God? Is it a cosmic light? Or an infinite space? The Gita is a story of ascension, a classic root of Hindu philosophy many thousands of years old. In this chapter the blue God Krishna offers to Arjuna many different images of Supreme power by comparing it to familiar objects.

The Bhagavad Gita outlines the eternal laws of Nature, life, death, and how to ascend to higher dimensions. Everything is symbolic. So, if we open our eyes and ears, it’s directly relevant to the issues we face today. Krishna’s song offers the concepts through which people can attain ascension and freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth. The blue God says he comes down to Earth whenever humans become separated the Laws of Nature. He empowers every person to take responsibility and embrace their divine nature, to release habits and thought forms that are no longer relevant in higher realities. With each chapter the Gita lessons are more refined and specific. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people knew and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, gaze over a vast battlefield, where Arjuna is required by royal duty to kill half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna tells him exactly how focus his mind in a higher understanding in which he will be stronger, bring benefit to his family, and incur no Karma for himself. Ultimately Arjuna accepts his destiny to fight this war. He and his brothers win and ascend to the heavenly realms.

In Chapter 10, Krishna shows how he is the source of everything that exists and gives a summary of the creation of the universe born from him. As the original, highest Supreme God, he’s sometimes seen as a fun-loving blue god playing the flute. But Lord Krishna is actually the original Supreme Almighty Power. The God called Vishnu is an expansion of him, like a professional role of creator. The God Brahma was born from the material energy of that. So we have the Hindu Trinity: Brahma the creator, Vishnu the preserver, and Shiva the destroyer.

Then genesis began, and it is quite different from Biblical stories. First Brahma issued forth the four Kumaras, which are realized perfect beings that roam the universal field as children. These were the first mind creations, meaning showed up without a physical birth. Next came the seven great Sages called the Saptarishi, the ‘mind-born sons’ of Brahma whose task is the procreation of the human population. These are the seven stars of the Big Dipper, Ursula Major, and the North Star, the pinnacle of heaven, upon which revolves the Zodiac, and all the other celestial bodies in space. Then come the fourteen Manus, also mind-born offspring of Brahma who rule the administration of humankind from the skies, to establish and protect the Sacred Laws of Nature. Each of these fourteen Manus rules an era, or cycle that last for billions of years. Right now, we are living in the era of the seventh Manu. Below that are the celestial abodes, in which many angelic beings or devatās are directly responsible for maintaining the universe.

So, we can say that Krishna is the original forefather of all forefathers. After each era the universe completely dissolves and is recreated again. To be a Manu is a very important job. For example, a few thousand years ago the seventh Manu was warned that the world would soon be destroyed in a giant flood. Manu built a boat for his people and all the animals, which he tied it to the horn of the great fish. The fish guided Manu’s boat through the flood to the top of a mountain. When the floodwaters receded, Manu poured butter and cultured milk into the sea, from which arose a woman so that she and Manu were able to repopulate the earth after the flood. This story is quite similar to the flood of the Sumerian tablets, Gilgamesh Epic, and the  Old testament.

To teach Arjuna the true power of the divine, Krishna compares his powers to other legendary gods. These are stories that every Indian knows, just like Westerners remember Bible characters Adam and Eve, Moses, the Ten Commandments, and Jesus.

The Laws of Nature, Truth, and celestial power are universal. However, the way we imagine this can be quite different. Krishna explanins from a cultural perspective, because otherwise it’s impossible to conceive of such immense power with the five senses and the mind. Every culture has its sacred pillars, mental images of religion, offering visual images and stories to help humans imagine the uinconceivable. The purpose of religion was never to bind, but to support and empower. Sadly, manipulation and control in organized religions have led many to reject the concept of God, which may NOT be an old man with a beard. Sometimes a blue god playing the flute can be an effective image.

Although the LAws of Nature never change, there is one big difference between Eastern and Western cosmology.  The concept of rebirth is a cornerstone of all Eastern cultures. Krishna says “the Soul Never Dies.” Even the original Bible writings and words of Jesus held the concept of reincarnation. However, in 545 AD  Roman Emperor Justinian made all the church leaders sign an edict that anyone who asserts the “preexistence of souls” would be punished by death. But the Pope Vigilius at the time refused to sign the Emperor’s edict into law.

So, Emperor Justinian had Pope Vigilius arrested, he convinced the other church leaders that the papal decree was authentic, and effectively forced the Pope to accept it against his will. Clearly the underlying motive was control. If people realized they were forever the children of God they might no longer need an Emperor, pay taxes, or support the Holy Roman Church. They decided to teach that God made brand new souls at conception and only baptism by the Church could bring their souls to God, otherwise people would be forever “cut off from God and doomed to Hell.” Maybe the edict was just an Emperor working in his best interest, but it was a big turning point in Western history. Nowadays his doctrine that you only live once is accepted throught the West, and has a powerful effect on our underlying reality. Maybe his selfishness led to unintended consequences in modern times, as people reject religious control and even deny the concept of God – like throwing out the baby with the bath water.

Krishna says God is a reflection of His energies, but he doesn’t tell us how to visualize that omniscient almighty power. This is highly personal and cultural. He says this is the Supreme power and reservoir of knowledge, truth, and beauty. He says since God is the source of all, we should make Him the object of our devotion. Of course, we know the Supreme power includes both Male and Female, we say “Him” as we don’t have a word for that.  Krishna reaffirms that Arjuna should accept his destiny and fight the battle holding his mind  on the Supreme power without fear, and he will win.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 10, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. How did Brahma create the world according to Hindu legend?
  2. Who built a boat and guided people to safety in the great Hindu flood?
  3. Which Roman Emperor banned reincarnation from the church doctrines? What was the year and the name of the pope arrested for refusing to sign it?
  4. Do you believe in reincarnation? How does your belief or disbelief affect your life?
  5. What’s your unique personal vision of the ultimate creator? How do you imagine something so all-powerful?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 11

The Blue God Krishna surprises Arjuna by showing him his true universal power. He shape-shifts from one magnificent form to another. Yep. Arjuna is amazed and terrified.The Gita is a story of wisdom and ascension, a classic root of Hindu philosophy. In this chapter the Blue God Krishna gives Arjuna a complete vision of the power of the multi-dimensional universe.

The Bhagavad Gita is richly symbolic, so if we open our eyes and ears, it is directly relevant to our own challenges. It outlines the laws of Nature, Science, Universal Power, life, and death, as these laws never change.  It describes techniques from ancient scriptures thousands of years before Christ, by which people can ascend into higher dimensions, to attain freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth. With each chapter the Gita lessons become more refined and descriptive. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people learned by heart and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, stand before a vast battlefield, where thousands of warriors are assembled and Arjuna must kill half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna tells him in 18 chapters the secrets to focus his mind in a higher understanding in which he will be most powerful, bring benefit to his family, and incur no sin or Karma. Arjuna listens, and finally accepts his destiny to fight the battle. He and his brothers win and ultimately ascend to the heavenly realms.

In this chapter Arjuna asks Krishna to show him his true form. Krishna then shows himself, and Arjuna sees for the first time the incredible vastness and majesty of the universe with multi-dimensional vision beyond time to see the whole universe enfolded in the body of the Supreme almighty. Arjuna is terrified, as Krishna shows his many aspects, some with brilliant emanations of light, others with billions of heads, giant teeth, and heavenly weapons. Arjuna is awed and humbled by the vision. He even gets to see the battle that will soon take place in which Krishna chews up the evil Kaurava clan in his vast mouth. Arjuna asks “Who is this terrifying form?” Krishna responds that he is death and Arjuna must fight the battle.  The Kauravas will die regardless because Krishna has already killed them, and Arjuna is merely his instrument of the Supreme power. On seeing this terrifying form of Krishna, Arjuna is both awestruck and unnerved. Arjuna bows deeply  and apologizes to Krishna for treating him as a friend. He begs Krishna to return to his previous, more human form.

Arjuna’s experience of awe, love, and fear gives him a tangible grasp of the vastness of the Supreme Almighty power. Krishna’s actual form impossible to completely know unless one actually achieves union with God. In these verses we can appreciate a Hindu view of the unseen world and its inhabitants. We see characters from Hindu legends, and all three gods of the trinity. Brahma, the god of creation, Vishnu the god of sustaining, and Shiva is the god of destruction, as all three emate from the same Supreme power. Arjuna sometimes calls him Vishnu because they are seen as different aspects of the same deity.

This shows just one way of visualizing the universal power.

For just a moment, Krishna grants Arjuna divine vision for him to see the multidimensional universe without the limitations of space and time. This means Arjuna saw an expanded awareness beyond time, so you see more than a tree for example, you also see  the seed, the sapling, the mature tree, and its death all at once. Without the limitation of space, he saw not just one tree, but all trees in the universe at once. Our human physical eyes and mind don’t usually see the total unity of things.

Creation and destruction are linked. Everything that existed in the beautiful form of Krishna, was also violently destroyed or absorbed by the same power. Yet, in creation and destruction there is perfect precision without randomness or personal bias. Finally, Krishna tells Arjuna how to attain full knowledge of Him in his personal form called Ishvara. He says one must fknow him through single-pointed devotion. When we work selflessly with one-pointed joy, we can know him in his cosmic form, and see the multiverse all at once.

Since Krishna has already destroyed the enemy warriors, and his victory is certain, Arjuna can forget about fear. He can just get up and fight.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 11, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What did Arjuna ask Krishna to show him? And what did Arjuna see?
  2. What was Arjuna’s reaction to the vision of universal power?
  3. Can you describe Arjuna’s vision of the multi-universe, unfettered by time and space? How would most humans respond upon seeing a true vision of the ultimate universal power? How might it change you forever? Would it terrify you or catapult you into permanent bliss?
  4. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  5. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 12

In this chapter, Krishna, the blue God, tells us that the key to ascension is Love for the Supreme Almighty, and a clear physical image of that Power is best. What is YOUR image of God?

The Bhagavad Gita is a story of wisdom and ascension, a classic root of Hindu philosophy.  Everything is symbolic, so if we open our eyes and ears, it is directly relevant to our challenges. This epic outlines the laws of Nature, Science, Religion, life, and death, as these laws never change.  It describes techniques from ancient scriptures thousands of years before Christ, by which people can ascend to higher dimensions, to attain freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth. With each chapter the Gita lessons become clearer and more focused. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses,  passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, stand before a vast battlefield, where thousands of warriors are assembled and Arjuna must kill half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna tells him how to focus his mind in a higher understanding in which he will be more powerful, bring benefit to his family, and incur no sin or Karma in killing. Arjuna listens, and finally accepts his destiny to fight the battle. He and his brothers win and ultimately ascend to the heavenly realms.

In this chapter, he explains that Love is the key. Krishna is the Supreme almighty shows up on the Earth plane as a blue-colored being whenever the laws of Nature and Goodness are lost. He says if you want happiness and freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth, Love for God is the number one key. This is somewhat parallel to the Christian 10 commandments. However, it was Jesus Christ who, talked about Love.

Krishna also says it is best to choose a physical form for God. If you‘re an embodied person, you need a face or a shape to put on God, as it is more difficult to focus one’s mind in meditation and worship of the unimaginable. It is hard meditate on something formless. When you can see it and visualize, even with your imagination, you can achieve more purity of mind. There’s no mention God as male or female, since it is understood that the Supreme power includes both and neither, therefore it is beyond duality.

He also says Love for God can also be expressed by infusing your actions with love. You can concentrate on detachment, or indifference to the results of your actions, and just offer your best to the Supreme Power. Expressing love through actions brings you freedom. Krishna claims that his favorite people are those who demonstrate kindness, always serene, unmoved by pain or pleasure” who shows equanimity, no matter what the circumstances. These are the ones most loved by Krishna.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 12, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What does God say is the most important key to achieve ascension, freedom from the cycle of death and rebirth?
  2. Why is it best for embodied persons to choose a physical form for God?
  3. Why is it more difficult to achieve freedom when you have no physical image of God?
  4. What is your personal image of the Supreme Almighty Power? Is it like a human form? A light? A geometric form?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 13

Can you discern between your physical body, your emotions, and your soul? The body, its feelings and experiences are IMPERMANENT. The soul that watches it is PERMANENT. It never dies. Can you tell which is which? Chapter 13 of the Gita shows us how to discern layers of personal reality as a living soul. YAY! The goal is freedom from death and rebirth, ascension into union with God. In order to do that, we must simply see through the various layers of experience in a body, to differentiate between Individual and Ultimate Consciousness. Microcosm – Macrocosm. This knowledge is critical, because the alternative is to live your whole life trapped in a limited materialistic 3D concept of the world, and suffer the same confusion lifetime after lifetime. No thanks!

The Earth and the Cosmos are subject to the laws of Nature, Science, Almighty Power, life, and death, which never change. The Bhagavad Gita is richly symbolic. If we open our eyes and ears to this 5,000 year-old text, written in Sanskrit the ancient language of the Gods, it is directly relevant to resolving our modern challenges. It describes ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, through which people can move into higher dimensions, to attain freedom from the material world. With each chapter the Gita lessons become clearer and more focused. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Breathe

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of sacred verses, that people learned by heart and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his chariot driver the God Krishna, stand before a vast battlefield, where thousands of warriors are assembled and Arjuna must conquer half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna tells him in 18 chapters how to focus his mind in a higher state in which he will be more powerful, bring benefit to his family, and incur no sin or Karma in the battle. Arjuna listens, and finally accepts his destiny to fight. He and his brothers win the war and ultimately ascend to the heavenly realms.

In Chapter 13, Krishna introduces an important concept, to remove the roots of suffering and entrapment in the 3D matrix. He invites us to notice how we identify with our body,our likes, dislikes, and how this forms a series of attachments, mental-emotional hurdles that obstruct our free passage to freedom. We are doing our best to translate from Sanskrit, the scientific language of the Gods. To re-express them in English language, now we are in the invisible scientific laboratory of pschyo-spiritual birthing. I’ll try to create clear images.

This Body Field kṣetra and the Knower of the field kṣetrajña into two categories, the microcosmic and the macrocosmic, to help us disentangle our physical -emotional experience. How does the individual Body field kṣetra, along with its own individual soul or Knower kṣetrajña, meet the external macrocosmic field and the knower of the entire world?

When we cease to see different identities which are due to different material nature, we can see that all beings everywhere come from the Supreme, and we thus attain realization.

The crux of the lesson is in the last verse #35: “Those who know through the eye of wisdom the distinction between the body field (microcosm) and the Knower of the field (Soul), and the highest God, they achieve annihilation of the Matrix and reach the Supreme.”
Please listen carefully and fasten your seat belts.

The Body field is defined as 24 different elements:

  • The 5 physical elements earth, water, fire, air, and space,
  • The 5 five senses (ears, eyes, tongue, skin, and nose),
  • The 5 five objects of the sense activities—taste, touch, smell, sight, and sound),
  • The 5 the five working senses (voice, hands, legs, genitals, and anus),
  • Plus 4 other elements: mind, intellect, ego, and physical energy called prakṛiti.

The Buddha taught: “All that we are is the result of what we have thought; it is founded on our thoughts, and it is made of our thoughts.”  Thus, as we think, that is what we become.

Therefore, it is necessary to cultivate appropriate thoughts and actions in the body field. For this, we must discern between the body field, and the knower of the field.

All the feelings, sentiments, emotions, etc., that arise in the body field as “modifications”, help purify the field and illuminate it with knowledge. Or they pull it down into confusion. Shree Krishna further says God is all-pervading in His creation, yet, He sits in the heart of every living being. Thus, He is the Supreme Soul.

So we have the Supreme Soul, the Individual soul, and the Body field of the living beings. This differentiation helps us  identify the correct causes of actions. We do not get caught in the illusions of their mind. We can perceive the presence of the Supreme Soul in every living being. We can also appreciate the unique material nature of each person in the larger field of existence pervaded by a common spiritual Soul. With this knowledge, we attain consciousness of the Brahman or God-realization.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 13, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1.  What is the difference between the physical body field and and the Knower of the field? How can you tell which is which? Which is permanent or impermanent?
  2. What 24 attributes are included in the Body field and are impermanent?
  3. What is the role of the Supreme God in relation to your Body Field and your Knower of the Field?
  4. Give an example of how you are able to differentiate between the Body Field and the Knower of the Field in yourself.
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 14

What three modes of Nature create the physical world? When you understand these, you will step through the matrix, says the Blue God, Krishna. These are called the three gunas, sometimes summarized as sacred, active, and passive. You could also boil them down to UP, Down, and Sideways but these are gross simplifications.

The Gita helps us understand the structure of the universe so we can find our place in it as a living soul. The goal is ascension into union with God, freedom from death and rebirth. In order to achieve that, we must simply see through the various layers of physics in a body, to differentiate between the three forces in Nature. We can ask: “Is this leading me UP? DOWN? or ROUND and ROUND? This is critical to understand, because the alternative is to live trapped in a material 3D worldview and suffer the same confusion lifetime after lifetime.

The Earth and the Cosmos are subject to the laws of Nature, Science, Universal Power, life, and death. These laws never change. The Bhagavad Gita is richly symbolic, so if we open our eyes and ears to this 5,000-year-old text in Sanskrit the sacred language of the Gods, we can directly relate it to our modern challenges. The verses describe ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, by which humans can move into higher dimensions, to attain freedom from the material world. With each chapter the Gita lessons become more specific and detailed. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people memorized and chanted for countless generations.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his charioteer the God Krishna, stand before a vast battlefield, where thousands of warriors are assembled and Arjuna must kill half of his family lineage. He is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna tells him the secrets to focus his mind in a higher state in which he will be most powerful, bring benefit to his family, resolve their differences, and incur no sin or Karma. Arjuna listens, and finally accepts his destiny to fight the battle. He and his brothers win and ultimately ascend to the heavenly realms.

In the fourteenth chapter, the blue God describes the three modes or gunas that give rise to physical life.

  1. Sattva is the principle of harmony or equilibrium. It is goodness, selfless love, divine generosity, bringing hope, expansion, and benefit to all beings,
  2. Rajas is the 2nd principle representing desire for movement, action, and experiences. It brings passion, greed, and accomplishment.
  3. Tamas is the 3rd principle representing lethargy or inertia. It can be a state of fear, contraction, and selfishness. It is not evil. It just relatively less good.

Everything in the universe is a combination and permutation of these three modes. This is the way  the wisdom of physical energy, Prakriti, activates all of creation. Every difficulty, misunderstanding, and disease, sickness, or war is seen as an imbalance of one or more of these laws of physics.

To achieve ascension, we need to look at these three properties and understand how they interact to bind us in the matrix. Sattva, the mode of goodness, being purer than the others, is filled with light and frees one from all sinful reactions. Living in this state helps to develop knowledge, however we might become conditioned and bound by the desire for happiness. Rajas is the nature of passion. It arises from desires, longings, and binds the soul through attachment to physical actions and their fruits, such as status and accomplishments. Tamas, is the lowest guna, the cause of illusion for all embodied souls. It deludes living beings in negligence, hopelessness, laziness, and sleep, which combine to bind the soul to the material world. Our physical state is greatly influenced by the foods we eat, which can be summarized as either 1) simple – living – pure, 2) spicy-sweet-stimulating, or 3) not alive – meaty  -greasy.

The way to ascension lies in overcoming Rajas and Tamas and developing more Sattvic qualities of peace, harmony, and tranquility. To do that, we can perform selfless actions as an offering to God, which reduces our attachment to passion and sensual experience. The higher quality of Sattva allows the Divine to shine through us. When we allow light to win, corruption or selfishness either dissolves or shows itself. Finally, we must transcend even Sattva and all desire for even happiness. One who has overcome these three gunas, cannot be disturbed or dragged around by their emotions and can be called free. We fear nothing, we hate nothing, we are balanced in goodness.

Krishna also explains clearly how to have a good death. If you die in the mode of goodness (Sattva) you attain the pure higher abodes of the wise. If you die in the mode of passion (Rajas), you are reborn among those driven by work, acquisition and accomplishment. If you die in the mode of ignorance (Tamas), you are reborn in the animal kingdom, he says.

This life is not a battle between Good and Evil, God and Satan. It is simply balancing the laws of physical Nature in ourselves, being established, sovereign and secure in equanimity and wisdom under all circumstances. Eventually this rising quality of Sattva can be visualized as a coiled snake ascending up the spine. Perhaps this was the gift of knowledge Adam and Eve found in the Garden of Eden. In Eastern philosophy, the rising energy of Kundalini represents the flowering of the spirit and rapid purification of the soul. In summary, the three gunas of Sattva, Tamas, and Rajas can loosely be boiled down to UP, DOWN, and SIDEWAYS. And the key to breaking the matrix is equanimity in the face of distraction.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 14, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What are the three aspects of physical nature? What is a word to describe each one?
  2. How can you balance an overabundance of the Rajas quality through diet and action?
  3. How can you balance an excess of Tamas through diet, lifestyle, or thoughts??
  4. Which guna is predominant in your life? What, if anything would you do to balance it?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 15

What is the structure of the universe? And how can you use this image to ascend out of the 3D matrix?

The purpose of the Gita is to help us piece together the form of the universe and understand our place in it as a living soul. The tree of life helps us focus our attention. The goal is ascension, freedom from death and rebirth, to permanent union with God. This has nothing to do with religion, only universal laws of nature. It helps us learn to see through the layers of sensory experience in a multi-dimensional physical life. This is critical, because the alternative is to live trapped in a material 3D world, and suffer the same misconception lifetime after lifetime.

 

The Earth and the Cosmos are subject to the laws of Nature, Science, Universal Power, life, and death, and these laws never change. The Bhagavad Gita is a richly symbolic 5,000 year-old text, written in Sanskrit the sacred language of the Gods. So if we open our eyes and ears, it is totally useful to resolve our current cosmic challenge. It tells us how to be free, how to carry out ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, by which we can attain freedom from the suffering and limitations of the material world. With each successive chapter the Gita lessons become clearer and more specific. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people learned by heart and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his charioteer, the God Krishna, stand on a vast battlefield, between thousands of warriors gathered to fight to the death. Arjuna and his soldiers must conquer his cousins, his teacher, and his childhood friends, all avowed to a a selfish path that stubbornly denies life to his people. Today it is his duty to vanquish them all, but he is horrified and refuses to fight. Krishna, the Blue God tells him the secret path to free his thoughts in clear knowledge of how to be even stronger in battle, bring justice to the world, resolve the family curse, and incur no sin in killing. Arjuna hears the lesson, and ultimately accepts his destiny to fight the war. This is the bloody battle of the ancient Mahabharata epic. He and his brothers vanquish the enemy, and eventually ascend to the heavenly realms.

In this chapter, Krishna, the blue God, explains the structure of the material world as a matrix that entraps humans in 3D, and shows how Arjuna how to see through it. He uses the image of an upside-down sacred tree of life. The mythical aśhwatth tree, also called a Banyan tree, grows very very tall with enormous roots. At the top of this tree is the Supreme God, the Source of all, and its roots stretch infinitely up into the heavenly realms receiving divine nourishment. The branches of this mythical tree extend downward into the material realms, where embodied souls wander up, down, and around, lifetime after lifetime. This universal tree is so huge, no one can imagine its size. However, as people do fruitive actions, it creates results in the form of leaves. This tree is also nourished by three gunas from Chapter 14, Goodness, Passion, and Ignorance so that people experience the senses and their objects grow like leaves and buds on the branches.

Ignorance of the tree keeps people wandering trapped in the matrix. Krishna says that the solution is to align with God by going UP to the Supreme Source, and to not even worry about the branches. He says we must then cut down this mythical tree with the axe of detachment. When we find the Supreme Source, we surrender our life to that highest in the God Realm and transcend the material world forever.

Krishna says every soul is divine, and every soul is a fragment of the Supreme God. However, physical beings are conditioned by limited physical laws in 3D, and totally distracted by the six senses, which include the mind. People living in a body, ignorant of their divine nature, might see sensory experience as all there is, and believe they actually control the results of actions. When we transcend this limited idea we are no longer trapped by the 3D material world. We are free. At that point the natural movement of the soul on death into a new body doesn’t carry confusion to the next life. So, in summary, Krishna says do not live distracted in the leaves or buds. Go up to the roots. Do not be distracted by sensory experiences, rewards, and the desire for getting ahead through actions in 3D. Look for the energy SOURCE, which is God. Even though God permeates each and every atom of the universe, and is within each of us, our attention is easily fooled. An expanded life is about balancing the 3 laws of physical Nature, being sovereign, rooted and calm enough to see through the sensory distractions with equanimity.

As we listen to the verses of Chapter 15, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1.  Can you describe the image of the physical world matrix as a tree of life? Explain its shape and characteristics.
  2. Using the image of the tree, why do embodied souls wander it confused?
  3. Why do people give so much credence to sensory experiences, actions, and the fruits of their actions?
  4. What is the secret technique to transcend the matrix of the tree and be free?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 16

In this chapter, the Supreme God tells us there are just two kinds of people in the world. Divine and Demonic. Yikes! He has some very strong words about it. We already learned in the last chapter when he said ALL beings are inherently divine. Here he lays out the slippery slope of how to discern divine qualities from demonic qualities based on people’s actions and reactions.

The purpose of the Gita is to help us understand the universe and our place in it as a living soul. The goal of physical life is ascension, freedom from death and rebirth, to permanent union with God. This is not about religion, but rather the laws of Nature, Science, Universal Power, life, death, and these laws never change. The Bhagavad Gita is 18 chapters of richly symbolic ancient verses in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods. If we open our eyes and ears to it, we suddenly discover how to see our modern challenges in a new light. It describes how to be free, how to use ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, by which we can ascend to freedom from the suffering and limitations of the 3D world. With each chapter the lessons become more specific and focused. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people learned by heart and chanted generation after generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his wise charioteer, the God Krishna, stand on a vast battlefield, between thousands of warriors gathered on both sides, determined to fight to the death. Today Arjuna and his brothers must vanquish their evil cousins, even his teacher and childhood friends, as they have chosen a selfish path that denies life to his branch of the family. As fate would have it, Arjuna’s duty is to vanquish them all. But he is horrified at the very idea, and refuses to fight. Krishna, the Blue God tells Arjuna patiently how to free his mind to become even stronger in battle, bring justice to the family, clear all the evil, and incur no sin in killing. Arjuna listens to the lessons, and finally accepts his destiny to fight. This is the bloody war from the famous Mahabharata epic. He and his brothers win although only a few are left standing. They vanquish the enemy, change the course of history, and eventually ascend to the heavenly realms.

In this chapter Krishna defines the qualities of people endowed with a divine nature. The Sankrit word is “daivim” meaning godly, divine, saintly. The qualities of such a person are fearlessness, purity of mind, steadfastness, charity, control of the senses, sacrifice, study of sacred books, austerity, honesty, non-violence, truthfulness, freedom from anger, peacefulness, aversion to fault-finding, compassion toward all living beings, freedom from envy, gentleness, forgiveness, fortitude, cleanliness, and bearing enmity toward none.

Then he describes the demonic person. The word “Asurim” means dark, without light, depraved, irredeemable souls, demonic, cursed birth after birth, or moving downward.

These people are deceitful, two faced, lying, arrogant, conceited, angry, harsh, ignorant, and selfish. The Gita says these qualities cause a continuous destiny of bondage by illusion through many many lifetimes. He says demonic people are often born into traditions of wealth and strive to dominate others. They tend to be driven and find pleasure in achieving great wealth, seeing it as the most important purpose of civilization. Every soul has the possibility of turning to God, but at a certain point, the illusion is so powerful that it becomes very unlikely. So, demonic souls tend to live in the hell realms and rule over them lifetime after lifetime. Dark souls are often born in lineages of families connected by birth, genetics, and love of wealth. The term in the Gita “demonic womb” refers to inherited curses or negative tendencies at birth from parents.

Associating with this type of people can become a slippery slope and a challenge to maintain one’s balance. The physical senses in 3D are very strong. They are not bad, but they can become your entire experience and distract you from your highest goal in life which is internal, invisible, and eternal. In every age the dark ones use similar techniques to secure and maintain power. Demonic people are willing to kill to expand their circle of wealth and control, recruiting others to establish a pyramid to dominate the world. They are secretive, and remain at the top. To maintain power they use various tools such as lying, or dividing unsuspecting people against each other through wars, ideology, skin color, and religions. They work against God and religion portraying it as stupid, countryfied, or unsophisticated. They turn one religion against another, or infiltrate them to change interpretations of sacred texts. These dark souls amass great wealth, yet always want more expansion, and are never happy. They maintain that the world has no absolute Truth, so they challenge the Laws of Nature, science, government, see no basis for moral order, and deny the existence of God. They maintain that life is physical, created from sexual intercourse and has no purpose other than to gain power and please the senses. They appear sweet and generous, but secretly intend to use people for financial benefit and pleasure.

Human beings possess a natural desire for happiness, higher states of awareness, and freedom. This is sometimes seen as a ladder, or a cosmic stairway to a godly state of being. Almost every religion describes this in some way. Hindu Mythology sees seven Higher God realms, and seven Hellish realms. To ascend, you must purify your thoughts steadily through a series of lifetimes toward freedom or Moksha, meaning your earthly lessons are finished, and you finally merge in union with God, ending the cycle of death and rebirth. While on earth you must try to move upward, not fall downward, to balance your physical duties with your goal of spiritual freedom. Finding the highest path requires sovereignty, protection, and discernment.

The 3D world is designed so that each experience can assist your ascension path. It’s important to understand the 14 realms as a cultural backdrop of the Gita.

These are the seven Heavenly REALMS or levels.

The seven LOWER HELL REALMS are very interesting. This is not just a devil heating you in a pot of oil, it’s much more  hypnotic, illusory and “fun”. After all, hell happens in the mind. Moving down from the Earth plane, we have

In addition, Krishna says there are just three gates to hell: 1) Desire of the senses (which includes sexual lust), 2) anger, and 3) greed. These three lead to self-destruction for the soul. If you perform good actions conducive to the welfare of your spirit, you will attain the supreme goal. But if you act under the impulse of desire, and forget the holy books, you’ll find no happiness, and you’ll lose your supreme destination.

As we listen to the verses of Chapter 16, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What are the qualities of a good or divine person?
  2. What are the qualities of a demonic person?
  3. What are the three gates to Hell, according to the Bhagavad Gita?
  4. Name a few characters on the world stage that you would consider demonic by these definitions?
  5. Name a few persons on the world stage that CLEARLY have a divine nature, and provide a positive example of a virtuous life? Are you sure?
  6. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?

Chapter 17

How do your innermost thoughts determine the quality of your life? How can you infuse your actions with enduring power to benefit yourself and others? This chapter of the Gita shows us the subtle shades of gray between Goodness, Passion, and Ignorance, in our actions, in order to bring positive energy into everything we do. It describes the sacred and sometimes invisible actions we can do to build strong virtue and harmony in our world.

The Gita is a precious resource to help us see beyond the limits of 3D physical life. Nature’s goal for us is ascension, freedom from death and rebirth, to permanent union with God. This has nothing to do with religion, but rather the universal laws of Science, Physics, Movement, and Energy. These laws of Nature never change. The Bhagavad Gita is 18 chapters of richly metaphoric verses in Sanskrit, the sacred language of the Gods. If we open ourselves to its deeper meaning, we suddenly see our modern issues in a new light. It describes how to be free and happy, how to use ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, in order to ascend to freedom from the limitations of physical life. With each successive chapter, the Gita concepts become more one-pointed and specific. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story…

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people learned by heart and passed down with each generation.

Today the warrior prince Arjuna and his brilliant charioteer the God Krishna, stand on a vast battlefield, between thousands of warriors on two sides determined to fight to the death. Arjuna and his brothers have suffered for decades. They offer sacrifices, make peace with the gods, and show charity to the other sides, but to no avail. The opposing army of his cousins, his teacher, and childhood friends, now insist on a selfish path that denies life to his people. Arjuna’s duty is now to conquer them all, but he is horrified at the picture before him, and refuses to fight. His best friend and chariot driver Krishna, tells him how to free his thoughts to become invincible in battle, uphold the family virtue, clear all the evil, and incur no Karma in killing them. Arjuna listens very carefully. He has made his offerings to the Gods, said his prayers, and finally accepts his destiny to fight the battle. This is the bloody war of the Mahabharata. After 18 days of vicious fighting he and his brothers win. They vanquish the enemy, although just a few are left standing. Ultimately at the end of thheir lives they ascend to the heavenly realms.

The Sanskrit word “Svabhaava” is a kind of essential reverence for life and for God that is sometimes translated as “Faith”. Svabhavva is said to come from our reservoir of past impressions, and can be increased or decreased with our actions and attitude. Some call it Mindfulness, “or Loving alertness”. Others call it the “Power of Love”. I like the term “Soul Awareness.”

In his book “Autobiography of a Yogi”, Swami Yogananda described so many difficulties in his life. where he failed to meet the worldly expectations of his family, friends and schoolteachers, because he had a constant passion for union with Spirit, an overwhelming love for God that made everything else meaningless in comparison. Yet this quality led to huge miracles in his life that changed the entire world. In the end, everyone honored and respected him for cultivating this infinite love for God.  I suggest we call this quality “Soul Awareness.”

We have already learned the three “gunas” or modes of physical existence are a foundation of the Gita. Let’s review what they are. Sattva is the guna of Goodness, connected to the realization of God. Sattva is closest to divinity, therefore, the most positive trait a person can have. However, even loving goodness can tend to bind you to the cycle of death and rebirth. So, everything must be observed in moderation and detachment.

Rajas is the realm of passion, action with desire for its results. Rajas comes primarily out of desire, ego, and the sense of “I”, although is not consciously negative or evil.

Tamas is darkness, heaviness, and ignorance. Rajas and Tamas are never positive as they pull a person away from God. Tamas is the lowest guna which encompasses dullness, apathy, inaction, ignorance, and negative actions like violence and chaos. Tamas is seen as an evil quality, such as purposeful ignorance, the intent to harm others, a rejection of God and lack of Soul Awareness.

People with the nature of Goodness pray to the highest gods. Those with the nature of Passion worship medium level demigods and demons. Those with the nature of Tamas or ignorance pray to dark spirits and ghosts.

Krishna urges us to focus on the quality of goodness,  and to refrain from actions motivated by passion or ignorance. Over time this will purify our thoughts and prepare us to enjoy eternal essence.

In this chapter, Krishna explains Soul Awareness or Svabhaava in relation to the most important actions we do, the foods we eat, and the frame of mind with which we live. This is also a question of cause and effect. Perhaps our lives are not only determined by our actions, but even more directly by our motivation, state of mind, our prayers and offerings to harmonize the universe around us. These are essential sacred actions that we must perform as embodied beings. It may come as a huge surprise and wake-up call, since these are not widely taught, performed or even considered important in modern times. Many of us go through every day without any thought about them. The four devotional actions are Charity, Sacrifice, Penance, and the Foods we eat. Let’s consider these.

Charity is an act of giving, to others, and sharing with unlimited loving kindness toward all beings. And with God. Charity in the highest mode of Goodness is a gift when we have no expectation of return, at the proper time and place, to a worthy person. Charity in the mode of passion is given with some expectation, grudgingly, or with a desire for results. Charity in the mode of ignorance is given with contempt, to someone unworthy, at a wrong place and time, or with intent to harm. Charity is a powerful energy, even if it is not recognized by others.

Sacrifice is an essential action to honor, revere, or make an offering to the Gods. Vedic texts call this “Yajna” and spell out established procedures that sometimes require a trained priest to perform. However, symbolically and spiritually every action we make as an offering to the Supreme God without desiring anything in return can be an act of sacrifice and worship. Sacrifice in the mode of Goodness follows the scriptural rules, with no expectation of reward. Sacrifice performed for selfish gain or material benefit is in the mode of passion. Sacrifice without Soul Awareness, against scriptural rules, without any mantras or donation is in the mode of ignorance. Sacrifice can be done in myriad ways, however in the modern world we often misunderstand or compartmentalize how it is expressed.

Penance is an action we do when we atone for our actions that may have caused pain to others. Every action brings a mixture of results, and we cannot always know the full extent of results of our actions. Hence, penance, repenting, or doing austerities to purify ourselves and to repair any damage we’ve done is an important part of life. In Sanskrit this is called Prāyaścitta. The three types of Penance or austerities that come from  the body, mind, and speech. Krishna reminds us to do no harm to ourselves with over-extreme penance. Our atonement, confession, acknowledging errors, and asking for divine forgiveness can reduce the karmic consequences. Penance can be honest and true in the mode of goodness, or it can be selfish and half-hearted in the mode of Passion. Atonement can be fake and evil in the case of Ignorance.

The Gita also defines three types of foods according to the three gunas.

The highest foods in the mode of Saatva or goodness are fresh, juicy, and encourage vitality. They promote long life, pure virtue, strength, health, happiness, and satisfaction. Foods in the mode of goodness or Sattva, are high in life force, nourishing, freshly cooked, and naturally have the best flavor.

Foods in the mode of passion or Rajas are exciting to the senses. They foods can be salty, spicy, hot, sweet, pungent, dry, very bitter, or very sour. These foods are said to stimulate passion, desire, and ego sense of “I”. They’re fun to eat, but are might lead to discomfort, and disease.

The lowest type of food is in the mode of ignorance or Tamas. Krishna describes them as foods that have lost their essence, are leftover, stale, cooked on a previous day, impure, rotten, or unsuitable for offerings. They tend to be less flavorful, highly spiced, old or stale, overcooked, or heavily processed, heavy in meat and oil, deep-fried, or contaminated. Dried, packaged, canned, or genetically modified foods are considered low quality. The foods we eat have an important effect on our frame of mind. People who live in the mode of ignorance tend to reject Soul Awareness and God. Hence, their life force will be low, and their thoughts will not be happy.

It’s interesting the Gita is very clear that our food choices and overall wellness depend on the energetic quality and freshness of the food. It doesn’t say anything about vegetarian or vegan or meat, which are prevalent distinctions we use today,

Krishna emphasizes that Soul Awareness and the Mental purification are not enough to lead a person to ascension. He says it is also essential to read and understand the scriptures. Now we are reading the Bhagavad Gita. There are myriad other scriptures in this and every true tradition.

Lastly, Krishna gives the sacred mantra “Om Tat Sat”. These three words call on the Supreme soul. They are used in ritual prayers and offerings to indicate the Highest Absolute Truth. These symbolic syllables are used by Brāhmaṇa priests while chanting the Vedic hymns  during sacrifices to Supreme God.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 17, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. What are the best foods to promote goodness, happiness, and health?
  2. What are the foods that stimulate passion, desire, and egotism?
  3. Describe the foods that foster ignorance, rejecting Soul Awareness and God?       
  4. What are 3 practical examples of Charity, Penance, and Sacrifice that you would like to use to cultivate inner Soul Awareness for a better life?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Chapter 18a (Commentary)

Chapter 18b (Verses)

In this last chapter, Krishna finally tells us how to achieve ascension, and how to sidestep Karma altogether. This is the longest chapter of the Gita, as it integrates important details about renunciation in action.

The purpose of the Gita is to help us understand the universe and our place in it as a living soul. The goal of physical life is ascension, freedom from death and rebirth, to permanent union with God. This has nothing to do with religion, and everything to do with the laws of Nature, Science, Universal Power, life, and death. These laws never change. The Bhagavad Gita is richly symbolic verses in Sanskrit, the ancient language of the Gods. If we open our awareness to it, we suddenly see our modern challenges in a new light. It describes how to be free  through ascension techniques from thousands of years before Christ, by which we can eliminate the suffering and limitations of the material world. With each chapter the Gita lessons become more and more profound. Just enjoy and listen with an open mind, as you would hear a story.

Once upon a time, in a faraway land, benevolent Gods ruled the Earth, and all learning took place in the form of stories and sacred verses, that people memorized and passed down with each generation.

The warrior prince Arjuna and his wise charioteer the God Krishna, stand on a vast battlefield, between thousands of warriors on both sides, all determined to fight to the death. Today Arjuna and his brothers must vanquish their evil cousins, even his teacher and childhood friends, who have chosen a selfish path that denies life to the people. Arjuna’s duty now is to conquer them all, but he is horrified at the spectacle before him, and refuses to fight. Krishna, the Blue God patiently explains how to focus his thoughts in Goodness to become invincible in battle, to bring justice to the family line, clear all the evil, and incur no sin in killing them. Arjuna listens carefully, and finally accepts his destiny to fight. This is the bloody war of the Mahabharata. He and his brothers fight valiantly. They finally win a difficult war, the enemy is vanquished, and they change the course of history, although in the end just a few of them are left standing. At the end of their lives, at last they ascend to the heavenly realms.

In this last chapter, Krishna explains the two kinds of Renunciation. He outlines how to completely eliminate Karma from your actions, he describes what is our duty in society, and how to surrender, to offe all your actions to the Supreme God, and transcend the matrix of illusion in the 3D physical world.

To achieve true liberation we need to understand two kinds of renunciation. The first is total renunciation called Sanyas, meaning, absolute rejection of all actions, for example, to formally choose a purely monastic life. Sanyas is a choice to  uncompromisingly give up ALL actions, with intense dispassion toward wordly things.

The second concept of renunciation is “Tyaga”, means relinquishing the fruits of action. Here “Tyaga” means “abandonment” of all that hinders the realization of the Self. For example, we perform actions, but we give up all mental attachment to the results. We act without being motivated by desire for reward or achievement. We do our best work but without desire for a specific result. This is an inner mental discipline, a letting go of desire. A “Tyaga” person can live in the world, hold a job, and have a family, with a special internal mental discipline of release. Try it, and see what is your experience.

The squeeze comes because embodied beings can never completely relinquish action. We must still sleep, eat, take care of ourselves, and we want to help others. At the same time, we can relinquish any expectation of reward or results of our actions. Also there are certain cleansing actions, that Krishna says no one should stop, like acts of duty, sacrifice, charity, and penance. So, to repeat the distinction: “Sannyas” is an external renunciation of all action in life. “Tyaga” is an internal dispassion to the fruits of your actions. Anyone can wear sackcloth, dreadlocks and talk like a Indian guru, but this doesn’t make you a renunciate of either kind.

Krishna then explains how to perform actions in order to not create Karma. This is very important!

We always look for a “cause” or an action. And people of little understanding may see themselves as the sole cause or agent of their action. However, rather than pinpoint a single “cause”, Krishna outlines five “elements” or “contributing factors” that must be present for any action. Many people fail to recognize these five factors:

  1.  the body,
  2. the agent,
  3. the senses,
  4. the efforts, and
  5. the Super soul

Then there are three factors that compel us to act:

  1. knowledge,
  2. action
  3. agent.

These three can be divided according to the three gunas or modes of physical nature. (We learned the three gunas in Chapter 17)

For example: 1) Knowledge in the mode of Goodness or Satva considers all beings as “undivided among many types,” seeimg the ALL as truly ONE single being. There is no idea of being separate. 2) Knowledge that sees the world as separate and disconnected individual beings is in the mode of Passion or Rajas. 3) Knowledge in the mode of ignorance or Tamas doesn’t care about the truth of things.

1) Action in the mode of goodness is right action with pure motivation. 2) Actions in the mode of Passion are to “satisfy desires”, to produce accomplishments or receive praise. However, Krishna specifically warns that “even the most praiseworthy acts / should be done with complete nonattachment.” 3) Actions in the mode of illusion or Tamas come from confusion and lack of care for others.

Next we describe the Agent: 1) In the mode of Goodness, the agent is free from ego and attachment. 2) In the mode of Rajas, the person desires results and is motivated by the ego sense of “I”. 3) The  person in the mode of ignorance is lazy and often cruel.

In addition, three more concepts of understanding, will, and happiness are each characterized by the three gunas 1) Happiness “which comes from long practice” for a person with a Nature of goodness is difficult to obtain yet brings serenity. 2) Happiness in the mode of Passion arises from the senses and 3) Happiness in the mode of Ignorance comes from indifference and laziness.

Krishna says happiness a metaphor for poison and nectar. 1) For the mode of Goodness, who practice discipline steadfastly, the effort feels uncomfortable at first, it starts out like a poison, and quickly turns to sweet nectar. 2) In the mode of Passion, happiness through sensory experiences begins as nectar, but quickly turns to poison. 3) Those driven by the mode of ignorance are always in a place of delusion.

Krishna also classifies these three qualities of Intellect, fortitude, and joy,  by guna, according to the Goodness, Passion, and Ignorance.

This process seems quite pedantic, but taken step by step is very straightforward, easy to recognize. And that’s the purpose. We need to make these distinctions quickly on the fly every day. In this way, Krishna conclusively proves here that no person and no action can ever be free from the effect of the three gunas or modes of physics. If we see ourselves as the only cause of our work, we are mistaken. However, with purified intellect, the wise can see they are neither the DOER, nor the ENJOYER of their actions. They are detached from the results. (!) Hence, they are free from karmic results of their actions.  This is the secret teaching of the Gita.

Vedic society consists of four main castes: Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas, and Shudras. Brahmans are Priests and Scholars, Kshatriyas are rulers & warriors, Vaishyas are Merchants and agriculturalists, Shudras are laborers and service people.

Caste or “varna” in Sanskrit means “to count, classify, or choose”. The Gita says these distinctions were never intended to be set by birth, but rather, to distribute duties by a person’s native inborn qualities. We have already said these spring from the three gunas and personal karma. Thus, what occupation is best suited to a person, can be determined by one’s own nature, not by wealth or birth family.

Ancient texts of the Manu Smriti and Dharma Shastras set out the Varna principles, based on personal qualities, not birth lineages. In ancient India, this open Varna classification led to rich variety and excellence in literature, medicine, astronomy, music, and more. Culture suffers when people look down upon other groups. A spiritual path and the goal of ascension is open to all, never restricted to a certain group. The scriptures say when we all perform our duties as a play of the Gunas without ego, attachment, or expectation, THEN we can attain spiritual perfection in society.

To conclude, Shree Krishna reveals to Arjuna that the most secret knowledge is to surrender one’s life and actions to God. He says: “Surrender, Give your life in service to the Supreme God and Absolute Truth. Seek the Highest God, Take refuge in God, submit all actions and enjoyment to the greatest Power. This will enable you to transcend the matrix of illusion in the 3D physical world in which you are trapped. Through God’s grace, you will break through in your spiritual journey. He warns Arjuna to share this secret knowledge only with the most devoted, as others may misinterpret and misuse it.

After having received 18 chapters of rich, divine knowledge, the warrior prince Arjuna tells Krishna that all his doubts and illusions are dispelled, and he is now ready to accept his duty to fight according to his duty. Sanjay, the royal clairvoyant servant who has been remotely observing this sacred dialogue, declares that he is amazed, and his hair is standing on end with wonder. Sanjay expresses deep joy and bliss to see the Supreme God today in his divine cosmic form. Here the Bhagavad Gita, The Divine Song of God ends, with the profound conviction that victory, goodness, opulence, and freedom will always rest on the side of God. And the light of Absolute Truth will defeat the darkness of falsehood and unrighteousness.

As you listen to the verses of Chapter 18, I invite you to ponder these questions:

  1. Can you describe the path of “Sanyas”, or total renunciation. How does one live?
  2. What is the path of renunciation called “Tyaga”? What is renounced and how does one live?
  3. How would you describe the three types of Actions according to the three gunas? Goodness, Passion, and Ignorance?
  4. What is Krishna’s secret path of action in which you accumulate no Karma?
  5. What are your favorite quotes from this chapter to remember for life lessons?
  6. What parallel events in the modern world illustrate these concepts?

Thanks for watching!

 

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